BMW developing new cooling technology - Page 2 - BMW EV Hub Forum
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post #11 of 14 (permalink) Old 03-24-2019, 12:06 PM Thread Starter
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Nanotechnology could very well become the next iteration of EV's, but thats only if they can become cost-effective to do so. New battery technology has greatly reduced the gap between batteries and supercapacitors. In due time we will have to move away from lithium-based materials.
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post #12 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-14-2019, 07:16 PM
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Its a long way out and should happen once traditional forms of EV tech are on their way out. Still lots of development left with that as we can see throughout the industry.
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post #13 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-30-2019, 01:00 PM
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@greenbeam do you think we'll see BMW start offering hydrogren powertrains? They are becoming popular.
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post #14 of 14 (permalink) Old 05-31-2019, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChargedI01 View Post
@greenbeam do you think we'll see BMW start offering hydrogren powertrains? They are becoming popular.
Last I read they were dead set on launching one. In fact they've been testing hydrogen fuel cell vehicles for a number of years already and are expected to launch something in 2021.

from bmwblog...
BMW CEO Harald Krueger reinforced last week the company’s commitment to launch a hydrogen fuel-cell car in the next five years for “larger model series …

BMW CEO Harald Krueger reinforced last week the company’s commitment to launch a hydrogen fuel-cell car in the next five years for “larger model series and long distances.”

BMW will produce a low-volume fuel-cell car in 2021, with wider availability in 2025, he said.

In 2015, BMW unveiled their vision of a future fuel cell-powered BMW. At their secret facility in Miramas, France, BMW let us test drive a 5 Series Gran Turismo equipped with the new technology. At the time, the Munich-based automaker said that the biggest hurdle in the adoption of fuel cells is the infrastructure.

Just a few months ago, Klaus Fröhlich, Member of the Board of Management at BMW AG, Development, also reinforced the brand’s commitment for zero-emission mobility through the use of hydrogen fuel-cells.

“However, until 2025 at least costs will remain too high and the hydrogen infrastructure too sparse to allow broad-based market penetration. By the time the fundamentals are in place, the BMW Group will also have marketable products ready that are attractive to customers.”

Brands like Toyota and its Toyota Mirai model have already made significant progress in this field. BMW is also going strong with their fuel cell technology, thanks to an agreement signed with Toyota in 2013.

The BMW fuel-cell concept vehicle is based on a regular BMW 5 Series Gran Turismo and uses a 245hp electric motor and high-voltage battery, similar to the ones used in BMW’s eDrive and i Division plug-in hybrids. A tunnel tank, used to store hydrogen, is mounted in between the two axles.

While the Toyota Mirai can travel around 435 miles (700 kilometers) on a single hydrogen fueling, BMW said it was developing a vehicle which would travel further, using compressed hydrogen. Some of the main benefits for this FCEV hydrogen fuel cell technology are the size and range.



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